Graduate Course Information

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Postgraduate Lectures and Seminars

The Middle East

Dr M. Clarke & Dr Z. Olszewska

M.11-1 (wks 1-4)

43 Banbury Road

(& 61 Banbury Road)

MSc Dissertation Class (SA)

Dr R. Sarro & Dr Z. Olszewska

M.4 (wk 3)

Human Sciences

 

MSc Dissertation Class (MA)

Prof. S. Ulijaszek & others

T.10-12 (wks 1-4)

61 Banbury Road

Ethnicity and Nationalism

Prof. D. Gellner

T.12 (wks 1-4, 6)

Exam Schools (Wk6 Human Sci)

Lowland South America

Dr L. Rival

T.2-4 (wks 1-4)

43 Banbury Road

Work in Progress Seminar

Prof. D. Gellner

W.9.30-11 (wks 2-3)

43 Banbury Road

Topics in Japanese Anthropology

Prof. R. Goodman

W.10-1 (wks 1-4)

Nissan Institute

PRS Class

Prof. D. Zeitlyn & Dr R. Sarro

W.12-1.30 (wks 1-4)

43 Banbury Road

Ethnobiology Methods

Prof. A. Gosler

W.2-4 (wks 1,3,4)

61 Banbury Road

Examination Preparation Session (SA)

Dr R. Parkin & Dr R. Sarro

Th.11-12.30 (wk 2)

64 Banbury Road

VMMA Class

Prof. L. Peers & others

Th.2-4 (wks 1-5)

Pitt Rivers Museum

Evolution and Human Behaviour (CEA)

Dr K. Magid

Th.2-4 (Wk 1)

64 Banbury Road

Fieldwork Safety (MSc & 1st MPhil)

Dr R. Sarro

F.9.30-11 (wk 3)

61 Banbury Road

Europe

Dr R. Parkin

F.11-1 (wks 1-4)

43 Banbury Road

PRM Research Seminar in Material and Visual Anthropology

Prof. L. Peers & Dr C. Morton

F.1-2.30 (wks 1-3)

 

Pitt Rivers Museum

Departmental Seminar

Dr K. Adhikari & El-Khachab

F.5 (wk 1)

F.3.30-5 (wk 2)

F.3.30-5 (wks 3-5)

Exeter College

Nissan Institute

64 Banbury Road

Other Postgraduate Lectures and Seminars

Evans-Pritchard Lectures

Dr N. Ben-Yehoyada

5.00. Wk 2 – M, T, TH

Wk 3 – M, T

Old Library, All Souls

Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity

Prof. S. Ulijaszek

Th.1 (wks 3-5)

61 Banbury Road

Undergraduate Lectures and Seminars

Ethnicity and Nationalism (2nd year)

Prof. D. Gellner

T.12 (wks 1-4, 6)

Exam Schools (Wk6 Human Sci)

Lowland South America

Dr L. Rival

T.2-4 (wks 1-4)

43 Banbury Road

Topics in Japanese Anthropology

Prof. R. Goodman

W.10-1 (wks 1-4)

Nissan Institute

Europe

Dr R. Parkin

F.11-1 (wks 1-4)

43 Banbury road

Departmental Seminar

Dr K. Adhikari & El-Khachab

F.5 (wk 1)

F.3.30-5 (wk 2)

F.3.30-5 (wks 3-5)

Exeter College

Nissan Institute

64 Banbury Road

MSc/MPhil (1st Year) Social Anthropology

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

MSc Dissertation Title Form

TT - Tuesday 2nd Week

2 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Dissertation

Last Wednesday in August; noon

30 August 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

MPhil Thesis Title Form

TT - Tuesday 5th Week

23 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

 

MPhil Social Anthropology (2nd year)

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

Thesis Title Form

MT - Monday 2nd Week

17 October 2016

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Thesis

TT – Tuesday 2nd Week; noon

2 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

Essay

TT – Tuesday 5th Week ; noon

23 May 2017

Submit 3 copies

 

MSc/MPhil (1st Year) Medical Anthropology

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

MSc Dissertation Title Form

TT - Tuesday 2nd Week

2 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Dissertation

Last Wednesday in August; noon

30 August 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

MPhil Thesis Title Form

TT - Tuesday 5th Week

23 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

 

MPhil Medical Anthropology (2nd year)

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

Thesis Title Form

MT - Monday 2nd Week

17 October 2016

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Thesis

TT – Tuesday 5th Week; noon

23 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

Dossier of practical work:

TT - Tuesday 5th Week; noon

23 May 2017

Submit to Examination Schools

 

MSc Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

Dissertation Title Form

TT - Tuesday 2nd Week

2 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Quantitative Methods assignments

TT - Friday 0th Week; noon

21 April 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

Dissertation

Last Wednesday in August; noon

30 Aug 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

 

MSc/MPhil (1st Year) Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

Essay, Paper 1

HT - Tuesday 1st Week; noon

17 Jan 2017

3 copies to Exam Schools

MSc Dissertation Title Form 

TT – Tuesday 2nd Week; noon

2 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Research Methods Portfolio (Paper 3)

TT – Tuesday 5th Week; noon

23 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

Research proposal/ essay (Paper 3)

TT - Tuesday 5th Week

23 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

MSc Dissertation

Last Wednesday in August; noon

30 Aug 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

MPhil Thesis Title Form

TT- Tuesday 5th Week

23 May 2017

Available/Returnable to Main Office

 

MPhil Visual, Material and Museum Anthropology (2nd Year)

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

Thesis Title Form

MT - Monday 2nd Week

17 October 2016

Available/Returnable to Main Office

Thesis

TT - Tuesday 2nd Week; noon

2 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

Essay

TT – Tuesday 5th Week; noon

23 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

 

Option courses examined by coursework (B2, B3, B5, C7)

Assignment

Deadline

Date

Notes

Coursework

TT - Tuesday 2nd Week

2 May 2017

Submit 3 copies to Examination Schools

 

 

Penalties for late submission of assessed coursework

The following penalties will apply to all assessed coursework that is submitted late unless there are mitigating circumstances agreed by the Junior Proctor (application must be made via your college: SAME staff cannot give extensions).

Submission after 12 noon on the submission date

two marks deducted

One day late

five marks deducted

Two days late

ten marks deducted

Three days late

fifteen marks deducted

Four days late

twenty marks deducted

Five days late

twenty-five marks deducted

Six days late

thirty marks deducted

One week late or more

zero for this piece of work

 

Examination timetables for written examination papers are now available from the Examination Schools website.

SAME Examination Conventions and Marking Criteria

Full details of the processes of examination and Marking Criteria for the MSc and MPhil degrees are included in the following documents. These detail the criteria used by examiners for assessing the different types of examined work for each of the degrees, as well as dates for submission of work, word lengths, penalties for late submission and exceeding word limits, and the mechanisms for progressing onto subsequent degrees.

The Marking Criteria, which appear in the APPENDIX of each document, have been developed to offer guidance to students on the criteria examiners will be using in judging assessed work. They are also intended to guide examiners in identifying the appropriate mark for the work being assessed.

The Core Criteria, within each given form of assessment (dissertation, exam, essay etc.), are consistent across all of the degrees above, and are viewed as the fundamental traits that define work for each grade band.

The Ancillary Observations include additional traits that may be exhibited by work in a given grade band, in general and in relation to particular subjects (Social, Cognitive, Visual, Medical Anthropology), and are there to aid decision-making in the allocating of a mark within a grade band, and to provide further guidance to students regarding the types of traits that work of a given class may exhibit.

The positive Core Criteria are not replicated across grade bands, so are viewed as cumulative (i.e., for example, work that is in the 70-79 band will be expected to exhibit not only those positive traits listed for that grade band, but those of the lower bands too, except where mutually exclusive).

Candidates are reminded to also consult the relevant course handbooks and Exam Regulations (‘the grey book’) for further guidance on the presentation and submission of assessed coursework.

These Marking Criteria supercede all previous versions.

This is a list of options for 2016-2017. Please note that these options are not guaranteed to be offered in future years.
 
A1. The Middle East (Dr Morgan Clarke and Dr Zuzanna Olszewska)
This introduction to anthropological work on the Middle East. Topics to be covered include classic considerations of systems of Islamic learning, concepts of self and society, relations between the sexes, ideologies of descent and marriage, and local constructions of history, but also contemporary popular culture, political movements, states and governance, and the politics and ethics of representation in a time of war.
 

A2. Japanese Anthropology (Prof. Roger Goodman)
This course has two main aims: (a) to provide an introduction to Japanese society from an anthropological perspective and (b) to show how the study of Japan can contribute to mainstream anthropological theory. Major themes which will be covered include notions of personhood, rituals and symbols, time and space, structure and agency, continuity and change, and the construction of ethnic, gender, sexual and minority identities. It will be possible to study a number of contemporary social institutions in depth, including the Japanese educational, legal, medical, welfare, company, household and kinship systems, new religions, and the worlds of traditional arts and popular culture. At the micro level, the details of these operations and the ideologies which support them will be examined, while at the macro level the course will explore their relation to other social institutions and the wider political and economic arena both inside and outside Japan.
 

A3. Native Peoples of Lowland South America (Dr Laura Rival)
This course introduces you to lowland South America, a region extremely rich ethnographically. The cultural area, initially restricted to the lowland tropical and subtropical regions east of the Andes, is defined more broadly today so as to comprises other lowland geographic regions as well, including the coastal and foothill regions on the western side of the Andes. Moreover, the course will show that cultural continuities between the lowlands and the highlands of South America have been much greater than originally thought. We will introduce you to the lands, peoples and histories of contemporary Amazonians, with a special emphasis on how they think about ‘modernization,’ and how they organize themselves in response to various threats to their ways of living a good life.
 
A5. Anthropology of South Asia (Prof. David Gellner, Dr Robert Parkin, and Dr Ammara Maqsood)
 
A7. The Anthropology of Europe (Dr Robert Parkin)
 
A8. History and Anthropology in the Sahara (Dr Judith Scheele and Dr Julien Brachet)
This course provides an overview of the enduring patterns and at times rapid changes that have shaped Saharan societies over the long span of the region’s recorded history, but with particular attention to the period since the late nineteenth century. Including the present-day Sahelian states of Mauretania, Mali, Niger and Chad to the south, and the Maghribi states of Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya, as well as the contested territory of the Western Sahara, to the north, this region has often been considered peripheral relative to its contingent worlds of the Atlantic, southern Europe, the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. It has more recently begun to receive more serious attention from scholars as constituting a dynamic region in its own right, as well as a ‘frontier zone’ of transcontinental cultural, economic and political crossroads and a new hotspot in international struggles for natural resources and the control of extra-legal mobilities and trade.
 
B2. Objects in Motion: Debates in Visual, Material and Economic Anthropology (Dr Inge Daniels)
This option explores key anthropological debates about the production, circulation and consumption of commodities through the lenses of markets, religion, and tourism. Drawing on comparative examples from around the world, but with a particular focus on East Asia, the aim is to critically examine contentious issues surrounding commodification, globalisation and cross-cultural circulation of people and things. Topics discussed include the exchange of commodities within gift economies; the impact of commercialisation upon spiritual forms; tourism and notions of authenticity; money, markets and the ethics of global trade; advertising and visual economies, the Internet and mobile technologies, and disposal and the second-hand economy.
 
B3. Powerful Things (Prof. Laura Peers)
This option considers the changing meanings and roles of material and visual culture across time and cultures. It will focus on the social and political roles of heritage items and images today as Indigenous societies strengthen distinct identities in postcolonial contexts through re-engagements with material and visual heritage. Examples will be drawn largely from Indigenous North America. How have objects enabled both change and continuity since contact? How do they feature in contemporary social and political movements to strengthen Indigenous identity? Why do historic objects matter to Indigenous people today?
 
B4. Key Debates in the Anthropology of Art and Visual Culture (Clare Harris and Elizabeth Hallam)
Key debates in the anthropology of art and visual culture, drawing on studies of art, artists, museums, and displays from around the world. It will begin with an overview of anthropological approaches to art, and a discussion of questions regarding ‘art’ and aesthetics as a cross-cultural category. We will then examine a range of anthropological concerns with regard to art: distinctions between art and artefacts; processes of production and circulation including art markets, collecting, and the attribution of value; constructions of authenticity and ‘primitivism’, theories of agency, and we will consider how anthropologists might study the burgeoning contemporary transnational artworld.
 
C3. Anthropology of Muslim Societies (Dr Mohammad Talib)
This option will draw on material generated from the study of different regions of the Muslim world, as well as the diaspora of Muslim communities in the post-modern / globalized settings of industrialized societies. The topics selected have a comparative and cross-cultural significance. Together they build up a picture of the larger universe of the Muslim world, thereby highlighting the problems and challenges which anthropological representation offers.
 
C5. Ethnographies of Transnationalism and Diasporas: Anthropological and Sociological Perspectives (Dr Leslie Fesenmyer)
This an introduction to ethnographic approaches to transnationalism and diasporas with an emphasis on the cultural and social aspects of transnational mobility and diasporic formations in an interconnected, post-colonial world. The course takes as its point of departure the lived experiences of migrants, refugees and other diasporic people, and asks how they make sense of mobility and displacement and construct senses of belonging. We will discuss the challenges of conceptualising, interpreting and contextualising new forms of transnational mobility and diasporic formations, but also ask if they really are new phenomena. This leads to a critical re-assessment of concepts such as place, space and context, and to reflections on methodological nationalism in social science research on migration and mobility. The course is structured around the following key topics: identity and belonging; gender, generation and lifecourse; the state; diaspora cultures, creolization and hybridity; memory and home-making; and urban diversity and multiculture.
 
C6a. Mobility, Nation, and the State (Dr Dace Dzenovska)
Contemporary life is hardly imaginable without mobility—of capital, things, ideas, images, and people. However, the effects of these forms of mobility and their desirability are variously distributed and perceived across historical and political contexts. This course will investigate mobility-related political tensions of the current historical moment. The course will engage with different theories and ethnographies of sovereignty, nation, and the state, as well as consider whether and how practices of mobility open possibilities for imagining alternative political forms.
 
C9. Language and Anthropology (Dr Ramon Sarro & Dr Theresia Hofer)
Understanding and using languages as means of communication lies at the heart of ethnographic fieldwork. Language is however also key to understanding a whole range of other social and cultural issues and theories in social anthropology and its subfields. This course will enable students to appreciate the core importance of language as a social practice and its role in socio-cultural processes, including religion, power, resistance, daily life, bureaucracy and introduces students to how anthropologists have studied language as a part of their research and how they theorised their findings.
 
C10. Introduction to Science and Technology Studies (Dr Javier Lezaun and Prof. Steve Rayner)
This course offers a postgraduate-level introduction to the field of Science and Technology Studies (STS). STS is a thriving interdisciplinary field, with a strong ethnographic tradition, that explores how new scientific and technical knowledge is produced, and its impact on society. STS has multiple empirical and theoretical synergies with anthropology, and has become an engine of new insights for the social sciences and the humanities. It is, in particular, a key resource for a new “anthropology at home”: the careful exploration of the practices that characterize modern Euro-American institutions and their global influence,

The student is primarily responsible for filling the form at the appropriate times and in the appropriate circumstances, as well as for making sure that it is signed by the whole range of individuals or authorities indicated (usually self, as well as the current or new supervisor, the college, the director of graduate studies, and possibly others). Once the form is complete, it should be returned to the general office for copying. The copies will then be filed locally and the originals sent by the COurse Administrator to GSO.

MSc to MPhil or vice versa

  • GSO 28, 'Change of programme of study'. This form is for transfers between different taught courses (including between departments). Do not use GOS 2 for these transfers.

MSc to PRS or MPhil to DPhil

  • Standard admissions form.

MLitt or PRS to DPhil; PRS to MLitt

  • GSO 2, 'Application to transfer status'. This is the form to use for upgrading research students. Do not use it for anyone who has been doing, or is transferring to, any taught course.
  • GSO 2b, deferral of Transfer of Status.

Confirmation of DPhil student status

  • GSO 14, 'Application to confirm DPhil status'
  • GSO 14b, 'Application for deferral of confirmation of DPhil status

 

SAME internal forms

 

Other forms:

  • GSO 3, appointment of examiners (for doctoral and MLitt vivas)
  • GSO 6, to change title
  • GSO 8, dispensation from statutory residence
  • GSO 15, extension of time
  • GSO 16, early examination (for doctoral and MLitt vivas)
  • GSO 17, suspension of status
  • GSO 17a, confirmation of return from suspension of status
  • GSO 18, extension of time to complete minor corrections (post-viva)
  • GSO 23, reinstatement to the register of graduate students
  • GSO 25, change of supervisor or appointment of joint supervisor
  • GSO 29, notification of withdrawal from programme of study

GSO (Graduate Studies Office) numbers can normally be found in the top right-hand corner of the first page of the form. The whole list of forms is accessible from Central Administration, from where forms can also be downloaded.

NB: the ‘student number' (OSS number) on these forms is not the University card number (always a seven-figure number beginning with ‘2') but the number of your student record. It usually consists of from four to six figures and may start with any number. It is the number found on student report forms, and it is also entered by GAO on the original application forms. If in doubt, ask in the ISCA general office or leave blank.

 

Feedback forms for taught courses

Feedback form can be downloaded here.

 

Training Needs Analysis form

The TNA form can be downloaded here.

 

Fieldwork and Ethics information and forms

Fieldwork and Ethics forms to be filled in well ahead of travel and fieldwork can be downloaded here.

Transfer/Confirmation of Status Assessment work - can it be given directly to assessors?

Yes it can.

My Transfer/Confirmation is due this term. Does this mean I have to apply by the end of Week 8 or by the end of the vacation?

Under the Exam regulations, milestones must be completed by the end of the term in which they are due (which includes the vac following the term). This means that your application form, GSO2 or GSO14, must be signed by the Director of Graduate Studies to confirm that your assessors' report (recommending a pass) has been approved, no later than Friday of Week 0. In order to complete transfer or confirmation within the term you will need to make your application several weeks earlier to allow time for the assessors to hold the interview and submit their report. Check with the department about the specific hand-in deadlines for each term. Your application form must be signed by your supervisor(s) and college before you hand it in with your written work.

I have been given leave to supplicate but haven't graduated yet. Can I get a letter to confirm that I've successfully completed my DPhil?

You can order a Degree Confirmation letter, free of charge from the online shop. You must have submitted your hard-bound library copy and, if you started the DPhil after 1 October 2007, the digital copy before you can order the Degree Confirmation letter.

I have been given leave to supplicate but I haven't graduated? Can I use the title of Dr?

No. Your graduation, in person or in absentia, is the point at which the degree of DPhil is officially awarded and you may only use the title of Dr after graduating.

I need to submit an application form but I'm not in Oxford. What should I do?

Complete the form as a Word document (forms can be downloaded from the website) and then type your name in the signature box (unless you can add a digital signature) and sent it by email to your supervisor(s) and then your college office.

When is the best time to submit the appointment of examiners form?

As soon as you have a realistic submission date. The thesis won't be sent t the examiners until they have replied to the formal invitation so it's much quicker if this is done before submission.

How do I order transcripts and on-course transcript/confirmation of study letter?

Transcripts are available from the University Shop. Unofficial confirmation letters can be requested from Vicky Dean in the School General Office.

I am submitting my thesis this term but I won't be in Oxford. Can I submit it as a digital file?

No. Digital copies can only be sent later by Exam Schools of the examiners request this. You are required to submit two soft-bound copies to Exam Schools. Most of the print shops in Oxford will offer a print, bind and deliver service so you can email a pdf of your thesis to them (remember to include the abstract) and they will submit the copies on your behalf. There will be a 1-day service but remember that if you leave it until the last day for submission you may find the print shop cannot fit your thesis in - they are always extremely busy in Week 0. Check prices, terms and conditions carefully as services vary.

Alternatively, you can have the thesis copies printed and bound wherever you are and sent by post - it's best to use a service with tracing and guaranteed delivery, i.e. Royal Mail Special Delivery or a courier, e.g. DHL, FedEx etc. Ensure that you allow sufficient time for your thesis to arrive by the submission deadline. Also ensure that your thesis is correctly formatted and printed on UK A4 paper size. Paper sizes are not the same in, for example, the United States. Information on formatting is in the 'GSO20a from 13Oct13' document.

When do I submit fieldwork risk assessments and CUREC forms?

Forms should be submitted at least eight weeks before travel and/or fieldwork. Tickets should not be purchased or research carried out before receiving approval. Further details here.

Is University insurance necessary for travel?

No, as long as there is private cover.

When do I wear sub fusc?

Sub fusc should be worn at Matriculation, Viva and Graduation. It is not necessary at Transfer of Status and Confirmation of Status.

What do I do if I lose my University card?

You will need to order a replacement card with your college but you must also let the School know so that the card can be deactivated on the door entry system.

How do I activate my card to gain access to buildings?

Students are automatically given access at the start of the academic year. If for some reason you haven't, please give the General Office your card details.

How do I extend my visa?

Please speak to Vicky Dean in the General Office at 51-53 Banbury Road who will be able to begin the process.

What are the opening hours for the Tylor and Balfour Libraries?

Tylor Library opening hours:

Term
Monday-Friday: 09:30-17:30 (shut 12:30-13:30)
Saturday: 13:00-16:00

Vacation
Monday-Friday: 09:30-17:30 (shut 12:30-13:30)

The Tylor Library is shut on Sundays, at Easter and at Christmas.

Balfour Library opening hours:

Term
Monday-Friday: 09:00-17:00

Vacation
Monday-Friday: 09:00-12:30 and 14:00-16:00

The Balfour Library is closed at weekends, for August and for Easter and Christmas. There are restricted hours on May Bank Holidays.

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